Tag Archives: internet sweepstakes in connecticut

Sweepstakes Operators Confident That Games Are Not Gambling Defined By State

..Sweepstakes Games Are Nation Wide Success..

The owners of the 3D Business Center will definitely not be allowed to function sweepstakes gaming machines while waiting for trial in their case testing the new law that bans such games in New Hampshire.

 

1-877-WIN-CAFE Sweepstakes Player

Rockingham Superior Court Judge Larry Smukler last week denied a basic injunction filed by Scott and Cindy Loring, owners of 3D Business Center, which has sites in Portsmouth and Seabrook.

Smukler ruled the Lorings failed to show “a substantial likelihood of success” on their lawsuits that sweepstakes gaming is guarded under the First Amendment and Equal Protection Clause of the Constitution.

The court agreed with lawyers from the state attorney general’s office, who said the new law is a law of conduct and not a regulation of expressive activity.Pre-Reveal-Gold

The Lorings submitted the claim last month against the attorney general after Gov. John Lynch signed House Bill 1260 into law.

While slot machines are prohibited in New Hampshire, the sweepstakes machines were legal before the new law entered effect June 18.

Attorney Patrick Fleming, exemplifying 3D Business Center, suggested throughout a July 12 hearing that sweepstakes gaming is nothing greater than a deal for the Lorings’ business, which offers Internet, copying, faxing and phone card services.

Fleming argued in court that it’s not gambling because customers do not need to buy anything to play the games, the outcomes of which are predetermined.

Customers are allowed to play 100 games complimentary, but if they desire to play more, they have to buy one of the center’s items, such as a phone card. Even if consumers lose in the sweepstakes game, Fleming claimed, they still win the phone cards.

Brian Buonamano of the attorney general’s office remarked the state views the legislation outlawing sweepstakes machines as a law of conduct.

They likewise said that if the Lorings were offering a legitimate item that individuals desired, they would not require sweepstakes machines to get them in the door.

Supporters of the new law called sweepstakes games a back-door method to gambling.

The Lorings submitted an application for a basic injunction to permit them to utilize the games, specifying they have lost 80 to 90 percent of their business since the law entered effect.

Smukler ruled that it is clear the consumers of 3D Business Center are acquiring telephone cards to play the computer terminals rather than to make calls.

Although the Lorings may supply long-distance telephone gain access to as a product, Smukler ruled, in reality, the product is a chance to play casino-style games that add or take off points and credits that consumers may transform to cash.

Smukler commented the state has the capacity to moderate sweepstakes operations in a fashion reasonably connected to its legitimate interests.

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Sweepstakes Case To Be Heard Soon

The owners of the 3D Business Center will definitely not be allowed to function sweepstakes gaming machines while waiting for trial in their case testing the new law that bans such games in New Hampshire.

 

1-877-WIN-CAFE Sweepstakes Player

Rockingham Superior Court Judge Larry Smukler last week denied a basic injunction filed by Scott and Cindy Loring, owners of 3D Business Center, which has sites in Portsmouth and Seabrook.

Smukler ruled the Lorings failed to show “a substantial likelihood of success” on their lawsuits that sweepstakes gaming is guarded under the First Amendment and Equal Protection Clause of the Constitution.

The court agreed with lawyers from the state attorney general’s office, who said the new law is a law of conduct and not a regulation of expressive activity.

The Lorings submitted the claim last month against the attorney general after Gov. John Lynch signed House Bill 1260 into law.

While slot machines are prohibited in New Hampshire, the sweepstakes machines were legal before the new law entered effect June 18.

Attorney Patrick Fleming, exemplifying 3D Business Center, suggested throughout a July 12 hearing that sweepstakes gaming is nothing greater than a deal for the Lorings’ business, which offers Internet, copying, faxing and phone card services.

Fleming argued in court that it’s not gambling because customers do not need to buy anything to play the games, the outcomes of which are predetermined.

Customers are allowed to play 100 games complimentary, but if they desire to play more, they have to buy one of the center’s items, such as a phone card. Even if consumers lose in the sweepstakes game, Fleming claimed, they still win the phone cards.

Brian Buonamano of the attorney general’s office remarked the state views the legislation outlawing sweepstakes machines as a law of conduct.

They likewise said that if the Lorings were offering a legitimate item that individuals desired, they would not require sweepstakes machines to get them in the door.

Supporters of the new law called sweepstakes games a back-door method to gambling.

The Lorings submitted an application for a basic injunction to permit them to utilize the games, specifying they have lost 80 to 90 percent of their business since the law entered effect.

Smukler ruled that it is clear the consumers of 3D Business Center are acquiring telephone cards to play the computer terminals rather than to make calls.

Although the Lorings may supply long-distance telephone gain access to as a product, Smukler ruled, in reality, the product is a chance to play casino-style games that add or take off points and credits that consumers may transform to cash.

Smukler commented the state has the capacity to moderate sweepstakes operations in a fashion reasonably connected to its legitimate interests.

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No Injunction Issued For Sweepstakes Argument.

The managers of the 3D Business Center will not be authorized to run sweepstakes gaming machines while waiting for court in their case testing the new law that prohibits those types of games in New Hampshire.

Rockingham Superior Court Judge Larry Smukler last week did not approve an initial injunction filed by Scott and Cindy Loring, business managers of 3D Business Center, which has sites in Seabrook and Portsmouth.

Smukler ruled the Lorings was unsuccessful in disclosing “a substantial likelihood of success” on their claims that sweepstakes gaming is defended under the First Amendment and Equal Protection Clause of the Constitution.

The court acceded with lawyers from the Attorney General’s Office, that announced the new legislation is a law of conduct and not an operation of expressive task.

The Lorings submitted the lawsuit last month against the attorney general after Gov. John Lynch signed House Bill 1260 in to law.

While slots are prohibited in New Hampshire, the sweepstakes machines were legal prior to the new law’s beginning June 18.

Lawyer Patrick Fleming, representing 3D Business Center, suggested during a July 12 hearing that sweepstakes gaming is definitely nothing more than a promotion for the Lorings’ company, which supplies Internet, copying, faxing and phone card options.

Fleming argued in court that it’s not gambling given that customers do not have to make a purchase to play the games, the outcomes of which are predetermined.

Patrons are permitted to play 100 complimentary games, but if they desire to play more, they must get one of the center’s items, such as a phone card. Even if patrons lose in the sweepstakes game, Fleming stated, they still win the phone cards.

Brian Buonamano from the N.H. Attorney General’s Office stated the state views the legislation banning sweepstakes machines as a law of conduct.

They additionally contended that if the Lorings were marketing a valid product that individuals wanted, they most likely would not have to have sweepstakes machines to bring them in.

Advocates of the new law called sweepstakes games a back-door approach to gambling.

The Lorings filed for a basic injunction to permit them to operate the games, saying they have lost 80 to 90 percent of their traffic since the law entered repercussion.

Smukler ruled that it is obvious the consumers of 3D Business Center are purchasing telephone cards to play the PCs rather than to make telephone call.

Although the Lorings may provide long-distance telephone access as a product, Smukler ruled, the item in reality is an opportunity to play casino-style games that accumulate or take away points and credits that patrons may transform to cash.

Smukler pointed out the state has the capability to handle sweepstakes affairs in means fairly connected to its legal interests.

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Sweepstakes Video Operators From Two States Submit Constitutional Claims

Operators of sweepstakes videogames in New Hampshire and South Carolina have filed suits against their particular state governments. Both suits assert that bans on electronic sweepstakes games are illegitimate because they violate free speech and equal protection.

Lawyers in both instances are obviously taking their cues from an Appeals Court judgment last March that labeled North Carolina’s sweepstakes ban unlawful since it violated first amendment securities on free speech.

The New Hampshire suit was submitted in June in Rockingham County Superior by Scott and Cindy Loring of 3D Business Centers (Portsmouth and Seabrook).

In mid-July, as reported by regional sources, the agents summoned the court for a preparatory injunction so they may proceed with managing the games until the case goes to court.

The Lorings are anticipating that a statewide ban on these devices (HB 1260) will be reversed, as it was in North Carolina.

In South Carolina, agent Terry Eddie Land of Gamecock Sweepstakes (Sumter) submitted a lawsuit in federal court on July 30 against the State Law Enforcement Division in reaction to a raid two weeks before that had closed down his operation. Likewise named as defendants are the Sumter County sheriff and the state government.

Land, that stated he paid $ 20,000 for state business licenses, insisted that his company is legal based on constitutional securities laid out in the 1st and 14th Amendments.

Former SLED director Reggie Lloyd, currently a sweepstakes business proponent, is helping Land with the suit.

Lloyd informed The State newspaper that comparable instances based upon constitutional premises have been submitted to protect sweeps games in Florida, Ohio as well as Arkansas.

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No Injunction Issued For Sweepstakes Argument.

The owners of the 3D Business Center will not be permitted to run sweepstakes gaming machines while awaiting trial in their case challenging the new law that bans such games in New Hampshire.

Rockingham Superior Court Judge Larry Smukler last week denied a preliminary injunction filed by Scott and Cindy Loring, managers of 3D Business Center, which has places in Seabrook and Portsmouth.

Smukler ruled the Lorings fell short to reveal “a substantial likelihood of success” on their claims that sweepstakes gaming is secured under the First Amendment and Equal Protection Clause of the Constitution.

The court concurred with attorneys from Attorney General’s Office, that declared the new law is a regulation of conduct and not a procedure of expressive activity.

The Lorings filed the suit last month from the attorney general after Gov. John Lynch signed House Bill 1260 in to law.

While slots are prohibited in New Hampshire, the sweepstakes machines were legal before the new law began June 18.

Attorney Patrick Fleming, representing 3D Business Center, argued during a July 12 hearing that sweepstakes gaming is absolutely nothing more than a promotion for the Lorings’ company, which provides Internet, copying, faxing and phone card solutions.

Fleming argued in court that it’s not gambling since consumers do not need to purchase to play the games, the results of which are predetermined.

Clients are enabled to play 100 games for free, but if they wish to play more, they need to acquire one of the center’s items, such as a phone card. Even if customers lose in the sweepstakes game, Fleming stated, they still walk away with the phone cards.

Brian Buonamano from the N.H. Attorney General’s Office stated the state watches the legislation outlawing sweepstakes machines as a law of conduct.

They also argued that if the Lorings were selling a legitimate product that individuals preferred, they most likely would not need sweepstakes machines to get them in the door.

Proponents of the new law called sweepstakes games a back-door approach to gambling.

The Lorings filed for a basic injunction to let them use the games, explaining they have shed 80 to 90 percent of their company considering that the law entered consequence.

Smukler ruled that it is clear the customers of 3D Business Center are acquiring telephone cards to play the computers instead of to make phone calls.

Although the Lorings may offer long-distance telephone access as an item, Smukler ruled, the product in reality is a chance to play casino-style games that add or subtract points and credits that customers may convert to money.

Smukler said the state has the capacity to manage sweepstakes operations in way reasonably related to its legitimate interests.

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New Hampshire Operators File Lawsuit

Operators of sweepstakes videogames in New Hampshire and South Carolina have filed suits against their particular state governments. Both suits assert that bans on electronic sweepstakes games are illegitimate because they violate free speech and equal protection.

Lawyers in both instances are obviously taking their cues from an Appeals Court judgment last March that labeled North Carolina’s sweepstakes ban unlawful since it violated first amendment securities on free speech.

The New Hampshire suit was submitted in June in Rockingham County Superior by Scott and Cindy Loring of 3D Business Centers (Portsmouth and Seabrook).

In mid-July, as reported by regional sources, the agents summoned the court for a preparatory injunction so they may proceed with managing the games until the case goes to court.

The Lorings are anticipating that a statewide ban on these devices (HB 1260) will be reversed, as it was in North Carolina.

In South Carolina, agent Terry Eddie Land of Gamecock Sweepstakes (Sumter) submitted a lawsuit in federal court on July 30 against the State Law Enforcement Division in reaction to a raid two weeks before that had closed down his operation. Likewise named as defendants are the Sumter County sheriff and the state government.

Land, that stated he paid $ 20,000 for state business licenses, insisted that his company is legal based on constitutional securities laid out in the 1st and 14th Amendments.

Former SLED director Reggie Lloyd, currently a sweepstakes business proponent, is helping Land with the suit.

Lloyd informed The State newspaper that comparable instances based upon constitutional premises have been submitted to protect sweeps games in Florida, Ohio as well as Arkansas.

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New Sweepstakes Legislation May Be Unconstitutional

All George Lambert desired was a freedom to play poker law.

But as an alternative, Lambert, a Republican state rep from Litchfield, says his original legislation, HB 1260, was “gutted like a fish” and also modified to close a loophole in the existing sweepstakes and gaming law.

The changed bill passed the NH House and also Senate June 18, particularly targeting organizations like the year-old operation in Nashua, Big’s Internet Cafe, Lambert pointed out.

On Tuesday Nashua Police verified that there is an open investigation of the gaming cafe. According to an additional entrepreneur in the Sun Plaza, police paid a visit to the business at 295 Daniel Webster Highway last week and extracted laptop devices.

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No additional details were offered concerning the “recurring inspection,” police stated.

Paul Kelly, director of the state’s Racing and Charitable Gaming Department in Concord, abstained from commenting about the Nashua company when spoken with today. But he did say that charitable gaming is a multimillion dollar market for the state.

According to the state gaming commission web site, currently that department moderates:

live horse speeding and simulcast equine as well as greyhound racing; and also games of chance consisting of bingo as well as Lucky 7. The Commission’s tasks feature the adjudication of hearing, the licensing of racetracks as well as individuals (drivers, managers, instructors, etc.), and also the collection of taxes and fees associated with bingo, Lucky 7, and gambling games.

The legislation has actually propelled legal action against the state from at the very least one small business owner with comparable gaming affairs in Portsmouth as well as Seabrook. That lawsuit, filed against the state attorney general in Rockingham County Superior Court, calls the new law “illegitimate,” according to a current account by Seacoast Online.

Lambert, a main sponsor of HB 1260, stated the issue for Big’s Cafe was that it had the ability to run under an exemption in the previous gaming law, by calling it a sweepstakes and also not directly accepting cash. He conveyed added worry that without oversight it is impossible for players to recognize exactly what their opportunities of gaining (or losing) were, and also exactly how much the business was netting in revenue.

Lambert stated he attempted to see exactly how the sweepstakes games run at a similar business in Manchester.

“I had the ability to review the guides, however wasn’t able to play. When I tried to inquire, they refused to speak with me,” Lambert pointed out, that summarized the games as sweepstakes slot machines.

“Explicitly, the terminology in the bill as amended by the House and also Senate was particularly designed to address places like Big’s for operating under a loophole of the law that enabled them to head out and market phone cards and also some other things that look like slots gambling,” Lambert said.

“That exemption was cleared away from the law with the passage of HB 1260, which is why they are currently able to shut them down,” Lambert stated.

For example, when it pertains to scratch lottery tickets, the possibilities are published on the rear unmistakably. Slot machines in casinos are governed to make sure payouts are predictable and also steady, Lambert stated. Such regulations are in place to reveal that, as a game of chance, it’s not fixed.

“Big’s was operating under the exception that states if you offer us money we’ll convert it in to points, then you go and play with those points and then you could redeem the difference in exactly what you have back to cash; that’s called fungible– the potential to exchange one thing for an additional,” Lambert pointed out.

Lambert said he is not opposed to law of gaming. Yet he stated overbearing law as well as a “nanny state” mindset is the wrong path. Under the present guidelines, it is an abuse of law to have a slot machine operation that is uncontrolled or approved by the state, as well as state does not permit any slots.

“Do I assume the state should transform that? Yes, I do. Nevertheless that set of operations benefits from some degree of oversight that creates customer security. In places where slots are managed, more than 90 percent of the money goes back to players. No one understands for sure just what that portion is in an affair operated by Big’s, and also there’s no way to verify that, so there is a capacity for consumer fraud or abuse,” Lambert stated.

As for his initial target, of addressing the procedures on playing poker, it is still technically unlawful here in New Hampshire to sit down and play the game for cash– even if you’re playing for coins with granny around the kitchen table.

If reelected, he will reintroduce legislation to broaden poker constraints in New Hampshire.

“There are people who leap out of wonderfully excellent planes for the adventure. There are even companies that let you to do that. So if you’re willing to take the hazard of climbing a mountain, skiing down a mountain, riding a horse, leaping from an airplane, and also waive your right to nanny state regulation, why not let a person to enter into a gambling game under the very same sort of release?” stated Lambert.

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Lambert said while HB 1260 is sound, since some regulation of law is acceptable in the sector of gaming, he would prefer to see the state permit consenting people waive their civil liberties, rather than be informed exactly how they can invest their time and money.

“I think, 100 percent, that if it’s your hard earned cash and you have actually obtained it, you must have the ability to do whatever you would like with it,” Lambert said. “Do you see the paradox?”

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Why Is Mass AG Still Raiding Cafes When Sweepstakes Business Model Falls Under ‘Free Speech’ In 4 States And Counting ?

A south Nashua gaming cafe that touts itself as a “contribution center” allowing patrons to “get in free of charge sweepstakes” as well as reveal results in an “enjoyable style by playing innocuous style casino games” has actually been closed down, a least temporarily, by authorities.

BIGS Cafe– an acronym for business, Internet, games and also sports– had been operating in the Sun Plaza, 295 Daniel Webster Freeway, for a bit greater than a year till its abrupt closure within the past few days. Nashua Police Lt. Michael Moushegian informed local news outlets that police are conducting a continuous inspection in to the establishment as well as suggested even more information will definitely be forthcoming.

It’s not known whether state level agencies, such as the New Hampshire Racing and Charitable Gaming Commission or the New Hampshire Lottery Commission, are involved in the inspection.

In a September 2011 Telegraph “New Business Bio” feature, co-managers Frank O. Godjikian and George L. Woods said they opened BIGS in June 2011 and also arranged to launch 10 more New Hampshire locations within three years. They described BIGS as a “business office” and also “Comcast as well as Ace ticket provider” that provides “cost-free Internet, computer sweepstakes games and also a bar with meals and beverages.”

A phone specified to Frank and Carol Godjikian in Billerica, Mass., visited an audio that explained the number is not in service. Calls to 2 numbers noted to Woods, even in Billerica, were not responded to, as well as messages were not promptly returned Monday.

Several internet sites link Godjikian and also Woods to the real estate business in the Billerica area. One of the business is Woods Realty, whose web site lists Carol Woods as the owner. That business’s web site includes links to its affiliates, one of whom is Godjikian. It specifies a different telephone number that additionally hits a “no longer in service” recording. Amongst his services, Godjikian lists “concierge services.”

On Monday evening, the doors were secured and blinds covered the front windows at BIGS. A compact sign explaining “Win Money Right here!” is out front, however the only task was individuals coming and going from surrounding companies.

A few drove up and positioned in front of the cafe, saying they wished to be sure they heard appropriately.

“We’ve been here a lot of times,” the lady, who didn’t offer her name, stated. “It was a lot of entertainment. All we found is that it closed; we don’t understand what took place.”

A woman that works at an additional business in the plaza said she’d heard that many police officers were positioned at the shop late last week, however she didn’t know whether they took any kind of property or hardware, or if anyone was imprisoned.

BIGS Cafe also declares on its website, www.bigscafe.com, it is a “contribution center” that raises funds for “important charities such as Homes For Our Troops and COPS for Little ones with Cancer,” yet the explanation of how contributions are raised is challenging to comprehend. Through its “fixed expert solicitation licensed by the State of New Hampshire,” the website states, “consumers that donate or that do not give away are able to additionally get in cost-free sweepstakes play by sending in a form delivered by BIGS … as well as delivering it to their sweepstakes head office, by asking the clerk on duty to reveal the results at the POS terminal, once again for no consideration or free of cost, or they may opt to divulge their results in an enjoyable style by playing innocuous type casino-like computer games.

“Whichever means one enters the sweepstakes or prefers to disclose the end results,” the site states, “the result is always the same and always no purchase neccessary.”

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New law halts game with cash prizes

By MICHAEL COUSINEAU
New Hampshire Sunday News

Members of Nashua Elks Lodge 720 paid a dollar a minute to buy phone cards and receive corresponding credits they could use to play games on a machine for cash prizes.

The lodge called it fun; the state called it gambling.

The lodge collected $70,000 in profits in six months from members playing these sweepstakes games on five machines, funding $15,000 in Christmas gifts for 75 children and renting a bus to take youngsters to summer camp, according to the lodge’s exalted ruler, Douglas Tremlett.

Patrons could use their credits to play poker and keno, among other games, he said. The most cash he heard of someone winning was about $900, he said. The Elks received 60 percent of the profits and paid prizes from money provided by the machine vendor.

“Most people didn’t care about the phone cards,” he said Friday. “We’d take the phone cards and donate them to the VA in Manchester.”

On June 18, Gov. John Lynch signed a bill making such sweepstakes games illegal in the state — and the Elks lodge had the equipment removed.

“I wish the state would legalize them just like bingo,” Tremlett said. “They made it easier for us to donate money to sponsor kids.”

By one count, the New Hampshire Racing and Charitable Gaming Commission said at least 16 locations in 13 communities, mainly in southern New Hampshire, hosted these sweepstakes games.

“From my own experience seeing the machines, there’s a lot of money out there,” said Paul Kelley, the commission’s director.

Kelley, who also serves as Seabrook’s town moderator, said he has seen the operation at 3D Business Center in Seabrook.

“There’s lines to play the machines, to supposedly buy their phone cards,” Kelley said. “When was the last time you went down to Cumberland Farms or Richdale’s to wait in line to buy a phone card?”

Portsmouth attorney Patrick Fleming, who represents the Seabrook business, said he has filed paperwork in Rockingham County Superior Court requesting a temporary restraining order against the state; a hearing will be held Thursday.

“I think it’s so overly broad it invites discriminatory enforcement,” Fleming said of the law.

On Monday, the state Attorney General’s Office will brief local police on the new law.

“We’re going to meet with police departments on what the law provides and talk about the possibility for investigation and enforcement,” Deputy Attorney General Ann Rice said.

The law, which began as an effort to expand poker games in the state, ended up reining in these sweepstakes games.

“What I hear is these are similar to video lottery machines you’d find in a casino,” Rice said. She declined to comment on Fleming’s court filing.

Not all the locations were generating profits, according to the owner of a former sweepstakes business at 223 S. Willow St. in Manchester.

“It simply wasn’t making money,” said James Daskal, owner of Connection House. “It wasn’t doing the numbers it was projected.”

Daskal tangled with city officials over licensing the machines, unsuccessfully appealing a $36,000 bill for licensing fees. He shut his business in April before the licenses were up for renewal.

“If you’re not making money, why throw good money after bad,” he said.

Daskal said people could come in and get free sweepstakes entries and earn more if they bought Internet time on 24 computers.

“I personally don’t think we were doing anything illegal,” he said.

Rice said the law allows for the attorney general, a county attorney or police chief to “go to court and ask for an order to cease operations,” and the machines potentially could be forfeited. Using the machines for gambling purposes can lead to fines of not less than $5,000 per machine per day.

According to the gaming commission, there were sweepstakes machines in Seabrook, Dover, Salem, Belmont, Nashua, Manchester, Hampton Beach, Raymond, Kensington, Hudson, Portsmouth, Hampton Falls and Londonderry.

Kelley said the list isn’t kept updated; at least some businesses have since had the machines removed.

Rep. Ken Hawkins, R-Bedford, worked on the law, flipping the bill’s intent by 180 degrees from the original sponsor. Rep. George Lambert, R-Litchfield. Lambert said his bill was intended to legalize certain poker games, including those played in private homes, and he opposed the sweepstakes language.

“By the time it got done, I didn’t own a single sentence in it, but it had my name on it,” Lambert said.

Hawkins said what Lambert’s proposal “amounted to for a lot of us is expanded gambling, and we’re against expanded gambling.”

The state lottery, meanwhile, worried about the competition from these unregulated sweepstakes games.

“There’s only so many discretionary dollars to go around,” said Charlie McIntyre, executive director of the New Hampshire Lottery Commission. “For us, it’s money not going to education.”

Back at the Elks club, Tremlett said the machines will be missed.

“A lot of our members wished it was back here,” he said. “They enjoy playing it.”

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NH lawmakers face fight against first amendment trying to ban internet sweepstakes

PLAISTOW — The state Senate passed a bill this week to ban businesses offering gambling machines and sweepstakes games, such as the one proposed in town.

George Chandler of Revere planned to open a “social amusement center” in Great Elm Plaza with computer terminals on which customers, playing with purchased phone cards, could earn prizes or cash. But after the Senate passed HB 1260 on Thursday, his business has stalled.

Sen. Bob Odell, R-Lempster, said the Ways and Means Committee made a few changes to definitions in the bill before it passed the Senate.

“The definition tried to encompass gambling machines that are used in sweepstakes,” he said. “They are competing as gambling outfits without any regulation. This is competing with legitimate, regulated, licensed gaming.”

The bill will solve a serious problem, according to House sponsor Rep. George Lambert, R-Litchfield.

“It’s very dangerous to have unmonitored, unregulated games of chance,” he said. “You don’t know whether or not the games are fair. When you have regulation, there’s a set of rules and the random number generators are neutral.”

The state Racing and Charitable Gaming Commission was a strong supporter of the bill, according to director Paul Kelley.

These type of games compete with state-run charitable gaming and they are growing in popularity, Kelley said.

“We’ve identified 12 to 14 of these places already up and running across the state,” he said

The bill must return to the House to have the amendments approved before it goes to Gov. John Lynch for his signature. But Odell said he believes by June 7, it will become law.

“I’m confident the governor would be prepared to sign it,” he said yesterday. “Once it goes into effect, the goal would be they wouldn’t be doing any more gambling at these locations. If it’s a company that’s selling phone cards, that’s fine. But if they want to run sweepstakes, that would be illegal.”

Odell encouraged Plaistow and other towns to carefully consider allowing these businesses to open in their towns.

“I wouldn’t think they’d want to have them go into business in the community,” he said.

Town Planner Leigh Komornick said now that the bill has passed the Senate, it will affect the town’s decision on Chandler’s business.

“At the next Planning Board meeting, copies of the bill will be distributed and reviewed,” she said. “I’ll be notifying the applicant and the property owner as well. If the applicant chooses to come to the meeting, he may do that.”

But the board is going to be cautious about making any decision yet, according to Planning Board Chairman Steve Ranlett.

“Obviously, the governor hasn’t signed it,” he said. “Yes, it’s passed the House and Senate, but it hasn’t been signed into law yet. So, we’re status quo. If it does become law in the state of New Hampshire, we’re not going to pass anything at a town level that’s illegal.”

Chandler hoped to open a 16,000-square-foot business at 37 Plaistow Road, selling prepaid phone cards. Along with the purchase of a card, patrons would get a chance to play games on one of 40 computers for a chance to win prizes or cash.

Chandler said he heard about the bill passing, but wouldn’t say what his plans are.

“I don’t know what I’ll do now,” he said.

This week in Seabrook, the town issued a cease-and-desist order to 3D Business Center for allegedly misrepresenting itself as a photocopy and Internet center, while really running sweepstakes games.

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